“We are Fucking Angry!”

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Transition to democracy is a bloody process. It is said that revolution can only be a revolution if it involves blood shed. Certainly, revolutions of the past involved a great deal of tragedy in the name of over-turning power. Has Tunisia had a true revolution yet? No. The structure of power has not changed totally. Moreover society has not changed yet, embracing the tenants of a liberal democracy. But they are in transition.

Are there any true liberal democracies in the world? That’s debatable. If we think of what constitutes a liberal democracy — true free elections, uncorrupt systems, protections of human rights and rights of minorities, true equality and freedom. Freedom House attests that freedom around the world has declined for the seventh straight year. Tunisia is ‘partially free’ as opposed to completely free. While Tunisia is making gains, these gains are relevant to the higher echelons of society. Ties binding freedoms in Tunisia are still felt by average citizens.

Blood has been shed in Tunisia, again. On February 6, 2013 Tunisian opposition leader Chokri Belaid was shot in the neck and head four times in Tunis, killed on contact by a contracted killer. By whom? No one yet knows, but the intent by those behind the murder has proven successful. The intended target is dead — but I ask which target is that? Was it really that they wanted this particular person dead or did they just want to distract political society away from any democratic progress? Both outcomes succeeded.

Demonstrations on February 7, 2013 were both violent in Tunis involving clashes in the streets and peaceful in other parts of the country. A demonstration in Sousse proved peaceful with Tunisian flags, flags of the Nationalist Democrats, carrying a faux coffin with speeches angry at the Ennadha Party and Rashid Ghannochi. But what if the assassin was not from this party? The transition to democracy proves chaotic and confusing.

You are angry. At what though are you really angry? That must be identified. How to do you — you Tunisian society – find a solution? Revolution will involve real long term change from the bottom up. The end of ‘structural violence’ through domination and control must be demanded by the bottom, it must be truly felt and then met by the top. Exchanging one dictatorship of a single man for the dictatorship of a party does not constitute a revolution. Revolution is on the one hand driven by intellectual elites, but it is also democratic by nature. Of the people, by the people.

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